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15th December 2017 
FAQ #01

Frequently Asked Questions


What is the difference between Counselling & Psychotherapy?
In both counselling and psychotherapy you will be listened to empathically and without judgement, within a safe space and relationship, where you can explore your thoughts and feelings.
Counselling is generally shorter term work for a current difficulty, possibly concerning one specific issue.
Psychotherapy can help with problems of a more long-standing nature. This work is usually at a deeper level, more intense, and longer-term.
At our initial meeting, we will discuss which would be more appropriate for you, and agree a contract for our work together.

What is Transactional Analysis (TA)?
TA is a way of understanding ourselves and how we relate to others.
Much of the theory of TA is easy to explain and to grasp and some of it may be familiar, such as the concepts of script and ‘games people play’.
TA is based on some core philosophical beliefs:

  • That people are born OK, and are intrinsically valuable
  • That everyone has the capacity to think for themselves and the right to do so
  • That people decide their own destiny and these decisions can be changed.

  • To learn more about TA and visit the UKATA website www.uktransactionalanalysis.co.uk , click here.

    What is humanistic psychotherapy?
    Humanistic psychotherapy emphasises the inner potential for growth and the tendency towards wholeness in human beings. The therapy seeks to create conditions which encourage growth and the freedom to be fully yourself.

    What is EMDR?
    Following the discovery in 1987 by Francine Shapiro that eye movements can reduce significantly the intensity of disturbing thoughts and feelings, EMDR has been used worldwide with people suffering from the effects of traumatic events. Since 2005, it has been recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) as a treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
    For more information from www.emdrassociation.org.uk click here
    and for the NICE website www.nice.org.uk, click here.